Month: September 1997

“Groove 103.1” switches from Rhythmic CHR back to Dance

In June 1996, KACD-FM (Santa Monica) and KBCD-FM (Newport Beach) switched from a Mainstream AC format to a Underground Dance format known as “Groove Radio”. While Groove Radio was unique, it was perhaps too unique for conventional radio. It never made any sort of dent in the ratings. During the summer of 1997, Groove Radio creator Swedish Egil was fired. The station remained in the Dance arena, but it became more mainstream (better suited for radio) — but not so mainstream that it could truly be considered “cheesy”. The name also changed to “Groove 103.1”, mainly because Egil owned the rights to the “Groove Radio” name. Then, on September 18, 1997, the format changed to an ordinary traditional Rhythmic CHR, yet the name remained “...

“The New 96.9 Classic Hits” KHTC evolves to “Eagle 96.9” KGLQ

Through the mid-90’s, Nationwide Communications seemed determined to make the Classic Hits format (which sounded a lot like a “lite” version of a Classic Rock format) work on 96.9 FM. It began with “96.9 K-Hits FM, Superstars of the 70’s and More”. Next in line was “The New 96.9 Classic Hits”. The start of the third and final attempt — “Eagle 96.9” — is featured here. One week after this name change, Eagle 96.9’s new morning show — featuring market legend Charlie Van Dyke plus the well-known and respected Michael Hagerty (also of KTVK-TV Channel 3, at the time) — made its debut. The announcement of this morning show change is heard on the audio. Just about one year after the debut of Eagle 96.9, Natio...

WFLN becomes Modern AC “Max 95.7”

After 40 years of service as Philadelphia’s Classical Music station, frequent ownership changes in the mid-1990’s and developing business trends led to the demise of 95.7 WFLN. Greater Media Broadcasting donated the WFLN music library to Temple University’s 90.1 WRTI. With Q102 leaning Rhythmic, the Modern AC format of Max was thought to fill a niche between Alternative Y100 and WIOQ. However, it took almost 6 months for Max to put together an airstaff and ratings were never able to get much higher than a 2.3 share. In May of 1999, as ratings were beginning to turn the corner after the addition of the Barsky Show in mornings, Greater Media pulled the plug on Max in order to beat AMFM to the punch with Rhythmic Oldies. http://formatchange.com/audio/70.mp3

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