Washington D.C.

WNEW Becomes Bloomberg 99.1

Previous Format: News “All News 99.1” New Format: Business News “Bloomberg 99.1” Date & Time Of Change: December 18, 2015 at 10:00am More Info: RadioInsight, Wikipedia Aircheck Contributed by Chris Roth

105.9 The Edge Becomes WMAL-FM

Previous Format: Classic Rock “105.9 The Edge” New Format: News/Talk (Simulcasting 630 WMAL) Date & Time Of Change: September 19, 2011 at 12:00pm More Info: RadioInsight, Wikipedia

94.7 The Globe Becomes Fresh-FM

Previous Format: Classic Rock “94.7 The Globe” WTGB New Format: AC “94.7 Fresh-FM” WIAD Date & Time Of Change: April 6, 2009 at 12:00pm More Info: RadioInsight, Wikipedia

WETA Goes Classical

Previous Format: NPR News/Talk New Format: Classical Date & Time Of Change: January 22, 2007 at 8:00pm More Info: Wikipedia Related Changes: Classical WGMS Becomes Variety Hits “George 104″

Classical WGMS Becomes Variety Hits “George 104”

Previous Format: Classical New Format: Variety Hits Date & Time Of Change: January 22, 2007 at 3:00pm More Info: Wikipedia

Big 100.3 WBIG Evolves From Oldies To Classic Hits

Previous Format: Oldies New Format: Classic Hits Date & Time Of Change: April 3, 2006 at 5:00pm More Info: Wikipedia, Washington Post

1500/107.7 WTOP Becomes Washington Post Radio

Previous Format: News New Format: News/Talk Date & Time Of Change: March 30, 2006 at 5:30am More Info: Wikipedia

“Z104” WWZZ Signs-Off

On 12:00pm on January 4, 2006 Bonneville Radio announced a shuffling of its Washington, D.C stations. News WTOP moved from its 1500/104.3/107.7 simulcast to 103.5. Classical WGMS moved from 103.5 to the 104.1/103.9 simulcast that had been the home of Adult CHR Z104. This was to pave way for the March debut of Washington Post Radio on the 1500/104.3/107.7 simulcast that had been home to WTOP. Z104 had been through a number of iterations in its 9+ year history. First was the pure CHR format in the mid to late 90’s. It’s evolution to a more adult sound lead to the station dropping the Z from its name for a few years in favor of “More Music 104” before returning to the Z104 name. Listen here as Z104 plays its final song, gives its last ID, and GM Joel Oxley announces wh...

99.1 WHFS becomes “El Zol” WLZL

At noon on January 12, 2005, 99.1 WHFS was switched to a Tropical Latin music format. Its call letters were soon changed to WZLL for a few days, and then again to WLZL, and the station was rebranded as “El Zol 99.1 FM”. Although a format change had been rumored to some extent for years–due to slipping ratings (22nd) in its primary market of Washington (although its ratings in Baltimore remained high)–the switch was not publicized beforehand and took many long-time fans, and even most of the station’s staff, by surprise. Most of the station’s staff were not told of the change until less than an hour before it happened, and new management presided in the air studio as the former format was playing its last few songs. Aircheck Courtesy of HFStival.com. Summ...

WWZZ Becomes Z104 Again

Previous Format: Modern AC “More Music 104” New Format: Modern AC “Z104” Date & Time Of Change: April 8, 2004 More Info: Wikipedia Aircheck Contributed by David Pierce

CHR “Hot 99.5” WIHT Signs-On

After the merger of AMFM Inc. and Clear Channel Communications, the Jammin Oldies format, which AMFM had been debuting in many markets began to falter. With little corporate support and a high burnout factor in the music, it was not surprising that the format didn’t last longterm. In the meantime, Clear Channel began debuting its “brand” of CHR’s in many markets. Washington, already home to Bonneville’s weaker powererd Z104, was next in line. With the “Kiss” name unavailable, Hot 99.5 was to be born. Getting there was where things got interesting. Bucking the trends, WJMO management gave the station a farewell weekend for the staff and listeners to say goodbye. On April 2, 2001 at 7:00am, Survivor Radio was born. Just like the TV show, 5 people wer...

“Jammin 99.5 ” WJMO drops Jammin Oldies

After the merger of AMFM Inc. and Clear Channel Communications, the Jammin Oldies format, which AMFM had been debuting in many markets began to falter. With little corporate support and a high burnout factor in the music, it was not surprising that the format didn’t last longterm. In the meantime, Clear Channel began debuting its “brand” of CHR’s in many markets. Washington, already home to Bonneville’s weaker powererd Z104, was next in line. With the “Kiss” name unavailable, Hot 99.5 was to be born. Getting there was where things got interesting. Bucking the trends, WJMO management gave the station a farewell weekend for the staff and listeners to say goodbye. On April 2, 2001 at 7:00am, Survivor Radio was born. Just like the TV show, 5 people wer...

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